There's innocence's in a monster; I would say.

Writing had never felt so good.

This is why it hurts the way it hurts.

You have too many words in your head. There are too many ways to describe the way you feel. You will never have the luxury of a dull ache.

You must suffer through the intricacy of feeling too much.

—Iain S. Thomas, I Wrote This For You (via abluesforbrklyn)

(via angelunchained)

She loves him so much that she prays for him before she breaks her fast everyday
As prayers are accepted before the Adhan.

She loves him so much that she’s always prayed for him before praying for herself, and for her beloved ones.

She loves him so much that she asked God to make him happy and successful in his life wether she’s with him or not.

—Ramadan, by Hadeia Adel. (via hello-hadeia-nour)

(via angelunchained)

لَو تطلُُبَ البحرَ .. فى عينيكَ أسكُبُهُ
If you ask for the sea, in your eyes, I spill

أو تطلُبَ الشمسَ .. فى كفّيْكَ أرميهـا
Or if you ask for the sun, in your hands I throw

أنـا أحـبـُّكَ فــوقَ الغَـيـمِ أكـتـُـبـُهــا
I Love You. Over the clouds I write

و للعصافـير , و الأشجار… أحكـيهـا
And to birds and trees, I tell

أنـا أحـبـكَ فـوقَ الـمـَـاءِ أنقـُُشُـهــا
I Love You. Over the water I carve

و للعناقـيدِ … و الأقـداحِ … أسْقِـيهـا
And to bunches and glasses I let drink

أنـا أحـبـكَ يـا سَـيْـفـَـاً أسـالَ دَمِــى
I Love You. O, sword that shed my blood

يـَا قـِصَّـةً لـَسْـتُ أدرى … ما أسَمِّيها
O, story that I don’t know what name to give

أنـا أحـبـكَ . حـَاوِِل أن تـُسـاعِـدَنى
I Love You. Try to help me

فــإنَّ مَــنْ بَــدَأ المَـأسَــاةَ يُـنـهـِيـهـــا
Because he who started the tragedy, should finish

وَ إنَّ مَـنْ فـَتـَـحَ الأبـْوَابَ يُغـلِـقهـا
And he who opened the doors, should close

و مَـنْ أشْـعَـلَ الـنِّـيـرَانَ … يُـطـفـِيهَا
And he who set the fire, should put out.

Nizar Qabbani (via themelancholyhill)

(via angelunchained)

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go
Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

psych2go:

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

(via psych-facts)

Ya sé que estás cansado, que no me querés más. Nunca me quisiste, era otra cosa, una manera de soñar. Andate, no tenés por qué quedarte. A mi ya me ha pasado tantas veces…

Rayuela - Julio Cortázar (via lophoph0ra)

(via quierentuespanto)

My identity was a big issue when I was a teenager, and I had a lot of questions, like: ‘Who am I?’ ‘Who do I belong to?’ But when I was still quite young, I decided that belonging is a tough process in life, and I’d better say I belonged to myself and the world rather than belonging to one nationality or another.

—Hiam Abbass (via kushandwizdom)

Although many writers had had periods of significant depression, mania, or hypomania, they were consistently appealing, entertaining, and interesting people. They had led interesting lives, and they enjoyed telling me about them as much as I enjoyed hearing about them. Mood disorders tend to be episodic, characterized by relatively brief periods of low or high mood lasting weeks to months, interspersed with long periods of normal mood (known as euthymia to us psychiatrists). All the writers were euthymic at the time that I interviewed them, and so they could look back on their periods of depression or mania with considerable detachment. They were also able to describe how abnormalities in mood state affected their creativity. Consistently, they indicated that they were unable to be creative when either depressed or manic.

The relationship between creativity and mental illness – a fascinating study based on writers from the prestigious Iowa Writers’ Workshop. Kurt Vonnegut was among the subjects. (via explore-blog)

(via langleav)